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Best Tulsa Shopping

AOL PICK from our Editors
Oh, goodness. We hope you aren't coming to Tulsa just to shop, because frankly the shopping is just so-so, with a few exceptions where one might enjoy spending a little dough. Utica Square caters to shoppers with a little more-than-average disposable income. Brookside has more of a local feel, with trendier shops and boutiques. And you never know what unexpected treasure you'll find among the shops of Cherry Street. That's not to say you can't find your typical mall offerings; just head to Woodland Hills Mall at 71st and Memorial, or the Tulsa Promenade at 41st and Yale. Both offer the exact same stores you'll find in malls across the U.S., but that could be exciting, too, depending on where you're from.

Utica Square

Neighborhood: Midtown

For decades, Utica Square has been where the well-heeled shoppers head for a little retail therapy. It's always attracted an affluent, upscale type of shopper, but newer additions like Pottery Barn and Anthropologie have democratized it a little. These days, people with a little money burning a hole in their pockets can feel comfortable as they enjoy a stroll through this lovely outdoor shopping center.

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Utica Square  

RiverWalk Crossing

Neighborhood: South Tulsa

About 10 miles south of downtown, this recent development doesn't necessarily have the best shops in town, but it has one of the nicest settings, as part of the development of the Arkansas River. A dozen or so specialty shops mingle with chain restaurants right near the water, and, while it's not the most scenic river you've ever seen, it does create a pleasant shopping atmosphere, and summer weekends brings live entertainment in an outdoor amphitheatre.

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RiverWalk Crossing  

The Farm Shopping Center

Neighborhood: South Tulsa

This outdoor shopping center is built around a restored barn, which is good to know, because without that claim to authenticity, the farm theme could be more than a little hokey. (A silo? Really?) Boardwalks connect small specialty shops sprinkled about, with shady trees and a friendly small-town feel. Ron's Hamburgers has a location here to fortify you while you shop. Check the website for a list of merchants, as the stores tend to have very specific themes. In other words, you might enjoy it if you're getting married, are a pipe-smoker or own a dog, but the selection won't titillate every shopper.

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The Farm Shopping Center  

Brookside

Neighborhood: Brookside

Shop, dine, shop, dine, shop dine. You can really make a day of it on the stretch of Peoria Avenue known as Brookside. Browsing the specialty shops that line the street can yield some sophisticated wares, including jewelry, home furnishings and clothing. There are few chains in this area, so you're more likely to find something special, and you can feel good knowing you're supporting the local economy at the same time. Be sure to duck into the Consortium at 3509 Peoria Ave., where you can wander the tiny boutiques in search of the perfect treasure.

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Brookside  

Cherry Street

Neighborhood: Midtown

A little funkier, a little artier, Cherry Street is where you go if you eschew the mall scene and don't necessarily want to spend $100 on a scarf. You just never know what you'll find in the area's interesting little antique shops, vintage stores and art galleries. Check out baby boutique Ding Bats, eclectic housewares at Charles Faudree, or vintage clothing and collectibles at Cheap Thrills. The best time to visit is on Saturday morning when there's also a farmer's market with food, crafts and great people-watching.

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Cherry Street  
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